General Instructions On How To Write A Good Discursive Essay

This short guide abbreviates some general instructions on how to prepare and write an above average discursive essay that is indicative of the academic standards and required rules and in line with traditional and universal academic conventions. A brief note is also given on what is meant by a discursive essay.

The purpose and function

Let’s begin with this explanation. Initially, the discursive essay’s purpose is to educate, inform and convince its readers with a particular point of view or proposal being made on a specific subject or event. The style of writing conforms precisely to academic conventions and rules and is written in a formal, objective and non-personal manner.

If several points are being raised as sub-themes to follow on the paper’s main theme, then these should be discussed in separate paragraphs. While the nature of the written discussion remains formal throughout, writers are reminded that sentences and paragraph lengths should be kept short.

Recommended preparations

Unless it is specifically related to the discursive discussion and in context with the subject, scholars and writers are encouraged to use a language register that will be understood by most readers other than academicians. Before moving onto how the discursive paper should be structured, let us briefly deal with recommended preparations before the main writing commences.

Proper project development, made up with draft notes, and free-writing exercises, close reading and extensive research remain essential to ensure the creation of an authoritative thesis statement and to follow the discussion. While there are many options open to students, the use of city and college library catalogues is highly recommended.

Structure

Finally, let us briefly highlight the main features of this academic sub-genre and how the written dissertation should be set out.

  • Introduction – Focus on raising the main points immediately and outline how the discussion will be set out.
  • Main body – The discussion follows with leading and following paragraphs in which each point is discussed separately.
  • Conclusion – Shorter than the introduction, the conclusion reviews briefly what was discussed and ends with a concluding statement.
  • Bibliography – All references, whether online links, printed texts, interviews and field exercises, must be listed alphabetically.

This short guide has prepared the way for both high school and college students to conduct an active discursive discussion formally and in writing to an academic style and its rules.

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